March 3, 2012
Stowe Boyd: Free Text Messaging Is Costing Telcos Huge

stoweboyd:

The use of data network-based text messaging allows users to avoid text messaging fees, and it is costing telcos a lot of money:

Alan Clendenning via AP

The London-based Ovum research firm estimates telecommunications companies lost nearly $14 billion last year in text-messaging revenue as…

The charges on texts are exorbitant, it should be expected that innovation would eventually kill this cash cow.  Bandwidth based payment plans make a lot more sense, although it’s better to self cannibalize than have a cash source die (which seems to be the path mobile providers are taking).

9:20pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZlVyHyHQdkEh
  
Filed under: tech mobile 
February 15, 2012
thenextweb:

According to the Forrester report, there will be 1 billion smartphone customers by 2016, with 257 million smartphones and 126 million tablets in the US alone. (via 1B Mobile Users by 2016, Apple, Google and Microsoft with 90% share)

thenextweb:

According to the Forrester report, there will be 1 billion smartphone customers by 2016, with 257 million smartphones and 126 million tablets in the US alone. (via 1B Mobile Users by 2016, Apple, Google and Microsoft with 90% share)

4:52am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZlVyHyGS8647
  
Filed under: tech mobile 
June 22, 2011
Digithoughts: iPhone applications hit the Asian masses

digithoughts:

Download numbers are rocketing for iPhone apps in Asia, but free apps are dominating and the proportion of paid downloads and the overall revenue lag behind the US and Europe.

From the report:

When analyzing the difference between publishing in Asia and the Western world in this month’s…

I’m not sure if mobile payments will gain traction in Asia for the foreseeable future.  Many people don’t have credit cards and can’t make online payments period.  If online gaming is any indication, most consumers in Asia prefer free products on an ad supported model.

June 20, 2011
underpaidgenius:

RIM is dead
(via CHART OF THE DAY: RIM’s Astounding Collapse In The U.S.)

I own a blackberry bold (got it 2 years ago), the best thing it has going for it is the durability factor.  You can drop this thing on the ground, sit on it, whatever - and it won’t break.
With that being said, blackberry didn’t act fast enough to update their outdated OS.  The blackberry management team completely missed out on the entire mobile app trend for consumer users.
Instead of spending R&D updating their mobile OS sooner, they decided to play copy cat by releasing a tablet device that is inferior compared to the iPad in every way.  That proved to be a terrible management decision.
The only thing keeping blackberry afloat right now is the fact that it has an embedded corporate user base using it for emails (that might be slow to adapt to other mobile OSs for the time being). 

underpaidgenius:

RIM is dead

(via CHART OF THE DAY: RIM’s Astounding Collapse In The U.S.)

I own a blackberry bold (got it 2 years ago), the best thing it has going for it is the durability factor.  You can drop this thing on the ground, sit on it, whatever - and it won’t break.

With that being said, blackberry didn’t act fast enough to update their outdated OS.  The blackberry management team completely missed out on the entire mobile app trend for consumer users.

Instead of spending R&D updating their mobile OS sooner, they decided to play copy cat by releasing a tablet device that is inferior compared to the iPad in every way.  That proved to be a terrible management decision.

The only thing keeping blackberry afloat right now is the fact that it has an embedded corporate user base using it for emails (that might be slow to adapt to other mobile OSs for the time being). 

(via underpaidgenius)

May 27, 2011
Digithoughts: 80 percent of paid Android apps get downloaded less than 100 times

digithoughts:

Latest monthly report from Distimo:

The percentage of all free applications that have been downloaded less than 100 times is 24.8%, and the percentage of paid applications that have been downloaded less than 100 times worldwide is 79.3%. These figures reveal how challenging it is for…

Not surprised at all.  With a few exceptions, mobile apps are better off going for freemium or ad based model.

May 21, 2011
Digithoughts: In-app payments is the new black

digithoughts:

App and game stat trackers Distimo and Newzoo have just released new numbers on iOS gaming. The shift towards free games with in-app purchases is strong. Really strong.

  • 88% of downloaded top 300 iOS games are now offered for free
  • In-game purchases (within both free and paid games)…

It’s going to be interesting to see how much phones and tablets affect next generation portable gaming console offerings from Nintendo and Sony.

I’m really surprised Nintendo hasn’t made a phone offering yet.  I think they could get a lot of the boys to teen-male market.  Gaming based phones would offer significantly more competitive gaming options for multiplayer focused games.  If Nintendo isn’t careful, they are going to lose their biggest cash cow (portable gaming devices).

June 23, 2010
Android / Open Vs Apple / Closed Systems Wars: It’s the same until it’s different

Reading some tech articles at lunch and I feel as if a large portion of the tech community is wrong about how the open (android/google platform) vs the more closed (apple) system will affect the mobile device / smartphone wars.

They are wrong because a large portion of them are assuming android based platforms will dominate and apple will die off in market share because the relatively more open app development/publishing process available on the android will eventually lead more apps being available (which is true) which will eventually lead users to prefer android platforms because of the greater number of apps (which is false in my opinion).

This theory is based on a few past situations:

Windows vs Apple: Windows provides a more open system which leads to significantly larger market share for Microsoft in the 80s.  Windows then comes to dominate the desktop market because many programs are available on Windows but not Apple.

Playstation vs Saturn vs N64: Playstation has most friendly development platform of the three gaming consoles.  N64 has the advantage of no loading times (with the use of cartridges as opposed to disk), which raised costs for 3rd party game developers.  Saturn has a more advanced system in terms of system specs, but it’s relatively harder to develop for.  Playstation has a massive victory.

Following this line of thought

Apple’s iOS vs Google’s Android vs Research in Motion’s platform (aka blackberry):  The first thing to note is that blackberry has a strong business focus, which puts it almost in its own category.  To a large extent, it has a stable basis of recurring revenue attributed to its common usage in the business community although it has made headway into the consumer market.  As such, I’ll leave it out and instead focus on…

iOS vs Android:  So the assumption among the tech community is that in the past,  ease of software / application development usually = eventual victory.

Here’s where they are wrong though:

Mobile devices / Smart Phones by most consumers for the following purposes:

  • Calling
  • Instant Messaging
  • Emails
  • Checking up on social media sites (facebook, twitter, foursquare)
  • Gaming
  • Basic Searching
  • Location / direction assistance
  • Mobile Photographs

These are all functions that can performed already on iPhones and android based mobile phones.  So given that all primary functions are already quite efficient on mobile devices, the battle then changes to a question of:

  • Battery Life - Apple products generally have better battery life because of the company’s focus on efficient simple design
  • Reliability - The closed end system makes it easier to keep track of applications to prevent any of them from causing an unstable system.
  • Ease of use / User Interface - Apple’s best known quality right there, simple/intuitive user interface
  • Security - A closed end system allows for a more secure atmosphere

All four of these arenas is where Apple is dominating.

The only benefit of the open end system is more applications, however there are already thousands of applications (with thousands more each month) and hundreds of which do the exact / similar things or are completely useless.

Let’s say that hypothetically, there is a great application that appears on Android platform but isn’t available on the iPhone.  Two things can happen:

  1. If it blows up in popularity, then that developer will create a similar app on the iPhone and RIMM.  After all, more users = more profits.
  2. They decide on principle not to develop for Apple.  In which case, another app developer will create something very similar in functionality for the iPhone and blackberry and reap all the benefits from the initial creator’s idea.  End of the day, iPhone will still get any unique attractive App that pops up on the Android platform first if it is great.  Those great apps are all that really matters at the end of the day.

Relative to larger desktop based application, mobile apps are relatively smaller and simpler.  As such, it is hard for me to imagine where a situation will play out in which the additional apps on the Android platform ever becomes an advantage.  It’s the nature of the beast, that an great app will be replicated (and quickly too) given the fact that mobile apps are smaller, simpler and faster to develop then say desktop apps.  This isn’t the 90’s where a great large clunky desktop application/program on the Windows takes several years before it appears on Apple.

For the developers believing that Apple is going “lose” to Android because of the open vs closed system nature of the two platforms, you are grossly mistaken.  Apple might loose, but the open vs closed system won’t be the reason.  There, it’s off my chest.