August 28, 2012
No one outchants Ron Paul backers

No one outchants Ron Paul backers

August 28, 2012

August 9, 2012
Decline in undecided voters for the 2012 presidential election

Indeed, in the last Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, only 8% of the voters failed to express a preference for one candidate or the other.   And when pollsters probed, they found that 84% of those who said they’d vote for Mr. Romney today were “definitely” or “probably” going to vote that way; only 16% were “just leaning.”  On the Obama side, the figures were even stronger: 91% of those polled said they’d “definitely” or “probably” vote to reelect the president; only 9% were “just leaning.” A New York Times/Quinnipiac University poll found only a sliver of voters in key swing states — 4% in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania — are undecided.

A lot of self-described “independents” are still in play – about 20% of them aren’t sure for whom they vote if the election were held today, according to the WSJ/NBC poll.  But these independents amount to only 16% of the electorate so truly undecided independents amount to only 3% or 4% of the overall voters – and who knows if they’ll vote at all.

The declining number of undecided voters makes sense given that most people can do online research on candidates themselves.  Voters aren’t dependent on waiting for major media outlets to learn about candidates. 

I wonder if there is a correlation between undecided voters and lack of a reliable internet connection.

10:58am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZlVyHyR3nCyY
Filed under: politics 2012 
October 12, 2011
Read the statements made by Cain and Paul in the image above.  Ron Paul was completely right and Cain was blatantly wrong about the housing bubble.

Read the statements made by Cain and Paul in the image above.  Ron Paul was completely right and Cain was blatantly wrong about the housing bubble.

(Source: antigovernmentextremist)

August 7, 2011
In Iowa and New Hampshire, Ron Paul is garnering more interest (and more consistent interest) than any other Republican candidate.  Just look at the snapshot I took from Google Trends comparing how often people are searching different GOP candidates using Google (in the past twelve months).  There are a lot of media venues that are pretending Ron Paul doesn’t exist, but search patterns on Google Trends tells a different story.  His message regarding limited government and anti-war foreign policy is resonating.  Despite the fact that the media publishes more articles about other candidates, people are looking up what Ron Paul has to say a lot more.  Notice on the bottom graph showing news reference volume (which shows how much the media writes about a person), Mitt Romney and Ricky Perry outpace Ron Paul.  Yet, when it comes to searches made by users on the top graph, it’s a completely different story.  Ron Paul outpaces all the other candidates.  This is a good sign especially in early voting states such as New Hampshire and Iowa, where search volume for Ron Paul is almost as much as all the other candidates combined.
Ron Paul is going to surprise a lot of people in the media going into the Republican primaries.  The media can ignore him, but the actual voters are paying attention to him.  In the mean time, expect to see a lot of articles by mainstream media outlets mentioning Jon Huntsman as a contender despite the fact that no one outside of Utah has any interest in the man.  Just look at the graph, facts are facts.

In Iowa and New Hampshire, Ron Paul is garnering more interest (and more consistent interest) than any other Republican candidate.  Just look at the snapshot I took from Google Trends comparing how often people are searching different GOP candidates using Google (in the past twelve months).  There are a lot of media venues that are pretending Ron Paul doesn’t exist, but search patterns on Google Trends tells a different story.  His message regarding limited government and anti-war foreign policy is resonating.  Despite the fact that the media publishes more articles about other candidates, people are looking up what Ron Paul has to say a lot more.  Notice on the bottom graph showing news reference volume (which shows how much the media writes about a person), Mitt Romney and Ricky Perry outpace Ron Paul.  Yet, when it comes to searches made by users on the top graph, it’s a completely different story.  Ron Paul outpaces all the other candidates.  This is a good sign especially in early voting states such as New Hampshire and Iowa, where search volume for Ron Paul is almost as much as all the other candidates combined.

Ron Paul is going to surprise a lot of people in the media going into the Republican primaries.  The media can ignore him, but the actual voters are paying attention to him.  In the mean time, expect to see a lot of articles by mainstream media outlets mentioning Jon Huntsman as a contender despite the fact that no one outside of Utah has any interest in the man.  Just look at the graph, facts are facts.

July 9, 2011
"I could end the deficit in 5 minutes. You just pass a law that says that anytime there is a deficit of more than 3% of GDP all sitting members of congress are ineligible for reelection."

Warren Buffett on CNBC (via sonicbloom11)

We need to make this a law immediately.

(via sonicbloom11)

July 5, 2011
""The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. It is a sign that the U.S. Government can’t pay its own bills. It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our Government’s reckless fiscal policies." - Barack Obama Explaining his 2006 Vote Against Raising the Debt Limit"

Debt when Obama became president - $10.5 trillion

Debt after three years of Obama - $14.3 trillion

We’re now talking about raising the debt ceiling again, with Obama pushing for raising the debt ceiling once more - change you can you believe in.

June 24, 2011
Election Year Oil Gambit by the Obama Administration

Apparently, starting two more wars (Libya and Yemen) to distract the U.S. population from a poor economy wasn’t enough for the Obama administration.  It is now acceptable for the Obama administration to release strategic oil reserves to prop up poor approval ratings heading up to election year. 

The U.S. and 27 other countries agreed Thursday to release 60 million barrels of oil from strategic reserves, temporarily driving down oil prices to a four-month low in a controversial effort to prop up the world’s fragile economy.

About half of the 60 million barrels would come from the U.S., 30% from Europe, and 20% from Asian countries. The IEA said the stocks, which represent less than 4% of the 1.6 billion barrels of emergency reserves, should begin reaching the market by about the end of next week.

But the decision puzzled some analysts. “We’re already several months into the Libyan disruption and a lot of the logistical rearrangement of supplies has already taken place,” said Guy Caruso, senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former administrator of the Energy Information Administration. “Most refiners I’ve talked to appear to be adequately supplied.”

After oil prices spiked above $100 a barrel earlier this year, President Obama in April ordered the creation of a special task force to ferret out manipulation in the market.

But if the IEA’s goal Thursday was to shake hedge funds and other financial investors out of the market, the move may have come too late for some. Even before Thursday’s plunge in U.S. oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange, prices had fallen more than $18 per barrel from the April peak, and are now down 0.4% in 2011, and U.S. data show money managers had recently pared their bets on rising oil.

Thursday’s drop in oil prices was not simply a reaction to the IEA news, said Dave Chatterton, managing partner at Powerline Petroleum in Champaign, Ill., which advises energy users on risk management. Weak U.S. jobs data, concerns about the Chinese economy and lingering reactions to the Federal Reserve’s signal that it will hold back from further stimulus all contributed to the sentiment, he said.

"It all kind of came together to give the larger speculator a signal to get out of the market," he said.

The impact of the move will likely be more psychological than physical. The 60 million barrels represents less than a single day of global oil consumption and only about three days of U.S. crude oil consumption.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce called the oil release “ill-advised and not the signal the markets need,” and urged the administration to boost U.S. oil production. “A temporary increase in supply is not a substitute for a long term fix,” said Karen Harbert, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber’s Energy Institute.

http://on.wsj.com/lUNbAK

Why exactly is the United States responsible for releasing half the reserves (30 million barrels total)?  This is oil the country is supposed to be saving for real emergencies.  The administration claims it is to counter a reduction is oil supplies from Libya (which mostly go to Europe by the way).  Maybe an unprovoked war with Libya should have been better thought out.  Especially since this don’t even account for long-term disruptions that could occur if the oil drilling facilities in Libya end up getting destroyed in the conflict.

8:26am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZlVyHy6P3fBc
  
Filed under: politics 2012 Obama oil